Skip over navigation
Upcoming Events News Multimedia About The Linda Contact Us

Event Details

STEPHEN KELLOGG WITH SPECIAL GUEST SEITH GLIER
Saturday, Jun 15, 2013 - 8:00 pm, $20.00



COUNTDOWN TO BLUNDERSTONE TOUR

Stephen Kellogg, former Sixers frontman, who successfully blended the insightfulness of the folk tradition with modern-rock showmanship steps out on his own with Blunderstone Rookery his first solo album since he and his band The Sixers went on indefinite hiatus. Kellogg will precede Blunderstone Rookery, which comes out June 18, with a solo tour with a stop at The Linda. Kellogg and the Sixers recorded seven albums together between 2004 and 2011. One of those, 2007's Glassjaw Boxer, was ranked among USA TODAY's best albums of that year. The hiatus had more to do with changing life priorities than any sort of acrimony between members. "We have a lot of love and respect for each other," Kellogg says. "They're my best friends; we've been doing this for 10 years." Kellogg co-produced Blunderstone Rookery with former Sixer Kit Karlson, and all the group's members appear on the album. "The big difference is that, as a band, we were a democracy of sorts," Kellogg says. "But on this record, I gathered everybody's opinions, then I did what I wanted to do." That includes recording a 10-minute track. "I couldn't do that to the band, be like 'Here's my 19-verse song; figure it out!'"

Stephen Kellogg
Autobiography - February 2013

My name is Stephen Kellogg. I'm thirty-six years old. I say that I'm from Northampton, MA because that's where I got my start, though now I live in Southern Connecticut. I've spent the better part of the last ten years on the road or in the studio, but I have four daughters and a beautiful wife too. I asked if I could write my own biography, partially because it saves money, and I figured if someone wanted to learn about me, I'd just as soon tell them myself.

My music has been described as Americana, Country-Rock, Folk, Singer/Songwriter, and, somehow, pop. I have always thought of it as American-rock n' roll. It's a product of my father's record collection, from Jim Croce and Cat Stevens to Eagles and The Band. Somewhere along the way, I fell in love with showmanship and acts that put on great concerts. Sometimes that meant Van Halen, other times it meant the Grateful Dead, and most recently it's probably more to do with John Prine. For what it's worth, Tom Petty is my favorite artist. Although it's been
pointed out to me by one quite popular publication that I'm "no Bruce Springsteen", I've decided to continue making music anyway (I'm laughing as I write this in case that's not clear).


The thing is...I fell into this job. I like people. I like sharing a world-view. I don't mind singing and playing guitar, but I never expected that I'd do it for a living. Like a lot of folks, I think I just figured I wasn't good enough
or that maybe it wasn't possible. The fact remained though that I needed a way to provide for my family, presumably just like those of you reading this biography (or for the younger generations, the same way your parents
have). Ultimately writing songs and playing them for people has become that living. There are many occupations for which I have immense admiration - doctors, soldiers and teachers topping the list. But there isn't another job I think I'd necessarily be suited for, so this is what I do.


In November of 2012, my band of the last ten years decided to take a hiatus. We performed our final show at Webster Hall in New York City for three hours and said goodbye for now. 2012 also took with it my mother-inlaw and my grandmother. Most of this happened in late Spring, when my house was under renovation; the foundation was still there, but the house was literally ripped apart. Some metaphor, huh? 2012 was a year of change if nothing else. The musical result of this tumultuous period is Blunderstone Rookery. The title comes from the boyhood home of my favorite character in my favorite book, "David Copperfield".


I produced Blunderstone Rookery in conjunction with my long-time musical collaborator, Kit Karlson. Mike Mogis (Bright Eyes, Monsters of Folk) mixed the album. We chose to make the record in Bridgeport,
Connecticut because, after making the last few in Los Angeles and New York, I really wanted to work on home turf. The music was played by a number of friends of mine, some of them play in bands you may have heard of (TravisMcNabb and Annie Clements from Sugarland, Sean Watkins from Nickel Creek, Jerry DePizzo from OAR), and many of them, including me, you may not have heard of. I loved working on Blunderstone Rookery more than any album I've ever made and it's my ninth studio effort. It was a fresh process. One that began with the exciting notion, "what if I say exactly what I want to say" and ended with me handing my father a vinyl copy to add to his record collection.

That, after all, is why I do this.

Using words and intention in the hopes of a positive legacy for my family.

Stephen Kellogg
February 2013

Seth Glier

Singer-songwriter and Grammy nominee Seth Glier knows thechallenges of emerging into adulthood all too well. Over the course of just a few short years, Glier has gone from opening act to headlining his own shows as well as major folk festivals, all culminating in a nod from the Grammys this year for the work he did on his sophomore record, The Next Right Thing. Having spent the majority of his teens and early twenties on the road, the now 24-year-old Massachusetts native describes his new album Things I Should Let You Know as "a reckoning
with adulthood."


Things I Should Let You Know offers one young man's perspective through expertly crafted stories entwined with exceptional musicianship and rife with incredible lyrical detail. Glier's songs aim straight for the gut and cast light on the challenges of adult life, through the lens of the everyday person.

For his third album on MPress Records, Glier opened himself for the first time to the opportunity of working with co-writers. As he explains: "I co-wrote a tune with Livingston Taylor, and a few with Ellis Paul and Marshall Altman. I'm very protective of my words, so co-writing seemed scary, but in the end I trusted these writers and we found a common vision." Glier, who has received two Independent Music Awards for his previous works, selfproduced this LP, Things I Should Let You Know with longtime collaborator Ryan Hommel and brought on Grammy Nominee John Shyloski (Johnny Winter, Stephen Kellogg) to mix and master.

Since the release of 2011's The Next Right Thing, Glier has shared the stage with artists as diverse as James Taylor, Ani DiFranco, Martin Sexton, Toad The Wet Sprocket and Edwin McCain. A troubadour in every sense of the word, he plays over 250+ shows a year, and when it came time to pen this record he decided to do it from the
road. Bits and pieces of songs were strewn across state lines, sung into mattresses, recorded in one fan's kitchen in Cleveland and on another's rooftop in San Francisco. As Glier asserts, "I wanted 'Things I Should Let You Know' to be a transformative experience for the listeners and I knew it couldn't be if I wasn't being transformed along the way."

The title Things I Should Let You Know might suggest something secretive, or that the young songsmith hassomething to hide. However, as Glier is quick to clarify, in fact the opposite is true. "This record is about confession; it's about baring all your skeletons in the light of day, making some much needed room in your closet, and living wide open."

Sponsored in part by 97.7 WEXT

No reviews at this time...check back later.

No Photos at this time...check back later

No Audio / Videos at this time...check back later

Coming Up

WINTER WARM-UP & SHAKE-UP MULTI BAND BLAST
Sat, Jan 10 - 8:00 pm
$10.00
Info - Buy Tickets

FOOD FOR THOUGHT - BANANA LAND
Thu, Jan 15 - 7:00 pm
$8.00
Info - Buy Tickets

LOST LEADERS
Fri, Jan 23 - 8:00 pm
$15.00
Info - Buy Tickets

THE GREAT DEBATE
Tue, Jan 27 - 7:00 pm
FREE
Info

Full Schedule

The Latest News

Fri, Jan 17, 2014 - LIVE: Guy Davis @ WAMC-FM’s The Linda, 1/17/14

Guy Davis prefaced his lightning-fast opening number at The Linda by saying, "I've stolen so much, this song doesn't even have a title!" And even if he hadn't name-checked Charlie Patton and Blind Willie McTell after it was all over, the SRO crowd could easily hear about 100 years of the blues coursing through Davis' acoustic 12-string guitar, right down to the off-time beat that recalled Robert Johnson's original version of "Crossroads." But as Davis says he tells his students, "It's okay to steal music - but once you steal it, you have to earn it!" Read More

Sun, Oct 6, 2013 - LIVE: Syd Straw at WAMC-FM’s Performing Arts Studio

ALBANY - It's been more than 20 years since singer-songwriter Syd Straw graced an Albany stage, but those shows at the now long-defunct QE2 still burn brightly in the memories of more than a few who were there back then. Read More


Feature Event

Tech Valley CommunicationsThe Honest Weight Food Co-opNYS Council on the ArtsThe ExitUpstate Independents